Part 199 tool for commercial ships

Use this tool to find out which requirements you may need to meet in rules Part 199: Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships.

This tool is not a substitute for applicable legal requirements, and is not a rule. It does not impose legally binding requirements. It is a quick reference guide. It remains your obligation to operate in compliance with the latest rules and other legislation, and to obtain legal and technical advice where appropriate.

Part 199 Rules requirements may apply to your ship. Instead of using this questionnaire, please check the guidance developed for recreational ship owners.

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Part 199 does not apply to ships undertaking voyages only in New Zealand’s lakes or rivers.

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MARPOL requirements don’t apply to your ship as it doesn't use fuel oil.

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You will need to provide the following details about your ship to use this tool:

  • The size of the ship in gross tonnage (GT).
  • Whether the ship travels internationally, even occasionally.
  • When the ship was constructed, or when it last had a major conversion.
  • The power output of the ship engine(s), including engines that are not used for propulsion, excluding those engines only used for emergency purposes.
  • Whether the ship has installed equipment that has ozone depleting substances (eg firefighting systems, and air conditioning systems).
  • Whether the ship has an incinerator, and if so, when it was installed.

No ship is identifiable to Maritime NZ by using this tool. This tool does not send any information to Maritime NZ. See the Maritime NZ Privacy Statement.

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YOUR SHIP’S DETAILS

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Recreational boats may need to comply with the requirements; however, operators of recreational boats should refer to guidance materials designed specifically to meet their needs.
The term fuel oil means any fuel oil delivered to and intended for combustion purposes for propulsion or operation on board a ship, including gas, distillate and residual fuel oils.
For the purpose of Part 199, a ship is considered to be international voyaging if it ever takes international voyages to a port or offshore terminal outside of New Zealand.

For the purpose of Part 199, a ship is categorised as domestic voyaging if the ship does not voyage to foreign ports or terminals at any time. A ship that voyages beyond New Zealand’s jurisdiction before returning (without entering a foreign port or terminal), would also be considered a domestic voyaging ship.
Definition of ‘constructed’:
In Part 199, constructed, in relation to a ship, means:
  • having the keel of the ship laid; or
  • being at a stage at which:
    • construction identifiable with a specific ship begins; and
    • the assembly of the ship has commenced and reached at least 50 tonnes or 1 percent of the estimated mass of all structural material, whichever is less (Reference rule 199.2).
Definition of ‘major conversion of a ship’:
A conversion of a ship is considered to be major:
  • which substantially alters the dimensions, carrying capacity or engine power of the ship; or,
  • which changes the type of the ship; or,
  • the intent of which, in the opinion of the administration (in this case, Maritime NZ), is substantially to prolong the life of the ship; or,
  • which otherwise so alters the ship so that, if it were it a new ship, it would become subject to relevant provisions of the MARPOL Annex VI convention not applicable to it as an existing ship; or
  • which substantially alters the energy efficiency of the ship and includes any modifications that could cause the ship to exceed the applicable required EEDI for the ship.
This requirement applies to sealed equipment with refrigerant charging connections that are installed on the ship that contain ozone depleting substances. Examples are water cooling, refrigeration, and air conditioning systems.

The rules do not apply to permanently sealed equipment where there are no refrigerant charging connections or potentially removable components containing ozone depleting substances. Examples of equipment not in scope are:
  • portable fire extinguishers
  • domestic type refrigerators.
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YOUR RESULTS

Your ship’s MARPOL requirements summary:

Remember, you are responsible for operating in compliance with the new Part 199 rules. You should always refer to the Marine Protection Rules Part 199: Preventing Air Pollution from Ships and the official guidance to learn about the new requirements.

1.1 3.1

Fuel requirements

It is likely that your ship will need to comply with the fuel requirements. These requirements include using low sulphur fuels that meet specific fuel quality standards, or using an equivalent method of achieving compliance that is approved by the Director.

It is unlikely that the fuel requirements apply to your ship.

Bunker delivery notes must be kept on board.

Fuel samples must be kept.

For more information see Section 3: Fuel requirements.

Part 199 Guide [PDF: 1.92MB, 76 pages]

1.2 3.2

Engine emissions (NOx) requirements for international ships

It is unlikely that the (NOx) requirements apply to your ship.

Note that Approved Method may apply – refer to Approved Method section in the NOx chapter.

It is likely that your ship will need to comply with the NOx requirements. These requirements include operating your engine within the NOx emission limits, and holding a technical file and Engine International Air Pollution Prevention (EIAPP) certificate for each applicable engine over 130 kW.

Other NOx requirements may apply to your ship.

These NOx requirements do not apply to your ship.

NOx emission limits apply regardless of the date of construction of the ship if the ship became a NZ ship after the rules come into force in 2022.

For more information see Section 4: Engine emissions (NOx) for internationally voyaging ships.

Part 199 Guide [PDF: 1.92MB, 76 pages]

1.3 3.3

Engine emissions (NOx) requirements for domestic ships

There are no engine emissions (NOx) requirements for your ship.

NOx emission limits apply to your ship.

All domestic ships with engines over 130 kW that were constructed or majorly converted after 19 May 2005 or become NZ ships after 1 January 2023 must meet the NOx requirements for domestic ships.

These NOx requirements do not apply to your ship.

NOx emission limits apply regardless of the date of construction of the ship if the ship became a NZ ship after the rules come into force in 2022.

For more information see Section 5: Engine emissions (NOx) for domestic commercial ships.

Part 199 Guide [PDF: 1.92MB, 76 pages]

1.4 3.4

Controlling other air pollutants

There are no requirements for your ship around controlling other air pollutants.

As your ship is a crude oil tanker, you must have a Volatile Organic Compound Management Plan (VOCMP).

It is likely that your ship will need to comply with the ODS requirements. If your ship has any installed equipment with prohibited ODS, the equipment may need to be replaced, and the deliberate emission of any ODS is prohibited.

Other ODS requirements may apply to your ship as it is 400 GT or more.

It is unlikely that the ODS requirements apply to your ship.

It is likely that your ship will need to comply with the requirements for shipboard incinerators. There are a range of substances that are prohibited from being incinerated, and if your shipboard incinerator was installed since 1 January 2000, it will need to be certified to show it meets the specifications defined by the International Maritime Organization. Other requirements may apply to your shipboard incinerator.

It is unlikely that the shipboard incinerator requirements apply to your ship.

Your ship’s incinerator must meet specification and certification requirements.

For more information see Section 6: Controlling other air pollutants.

Part 199 Guide [PDF: 1.92MB, 76 pages]

1.5 3.5

Carbon intensity reduction requirements

It is unlikely that the carbon intensity reduction requirements apply to your ship.

It is likely that your ship will need to comply with the requirements for carbon intensity reduction. The requirements include both having a Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan for the ship, and having a calculation of how energy efficient the ship is when in operation.

Other carbon intensity reduction requirements may apply to your ship.

Your ship may need to have the Energy Efficiency Existing Ship Index (EEXI) calculated.

Your ship may need to have the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) calculated.

For more information see Section 7: Carbon intensity reduction requirements.

Part 199 Guide [PDF: 1.92MB, 76 pages]

1.6 3.6

Reporting requirements for ships 5000 GT or more

It is unlikely that the reporting requirements apply to your ship.

It is likely that your ship will need to comply with the reporting requirements for a ship of 5000 GT or more. The annual reporting requirements include both fuel oil consumption reporting, and, for ships defined by the Part 199 Rules as ‘carbon intensity ships’, reporting on the ships Carbon Intensity Indicator rating.

Other reporting requirements may apply to your ship.

For more information see Section 8: Reporting requirements for ships 5000 GT or more.

Part 199 Guide [PDF: 1.92MB, 76 pages]

1.7 3.7

Summary of survey and certification requirements

Your ship must hold an International Air Pollution Prevention (IAPP) certificate and an International Energy Efficiency (IEE) certificate.

Other documentation requirements may apply to your ship.

For more information see Section 9: Summary of survey and certification requirements.

Part 199 Guide [PDF: 1.92MB, 76 pages]

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